MHM URGENT CARE MANDEVILLE LA

MHM URGENT CARE MANDEVILLE LA

Illness can strike at any time, even when your doctor’s office is closed. MHM Urgent Care Mandeville provides day and night walk-in care for non-life-threatening illnesses and injuries.

For those patients who cannot wait for their primary care physician, but do not require ER service, our Mandeville, Louisiana urgent care clinic is an excellent option, offering considerable savings of both time and money. The extended hours and broad scope of services provided by MHM Urgent Care have made it a valuable resource to patients as well as to local physicians.

Patients seen at MHM Urgent Care’s Mandeville LA walk-in clinic are treated by highly qualified staff and are referred back to their primary care physician for follow-up care. Patients needing specialty care will be referred to the appropriate specialist or to an emergency department.

Mandeville, LA Urgent Care Patient Services

  • Abscesses
  • Allergies
  • Asthma/Bronchitis
  • Bladder Infections
  • Colds/Flu
  • Cuts and Stitches
  • Ear Ache
  • Eye Infections
  • Fever
  • Flu Shots
  • Minor Burns
  • Nebulizer Treatments
  • On-site Digital X-Ray and Lab
  • Rashes
  • School Physicals
  • Sinus Infections
  • Sore Throats
  • Sports Injuries
  • Sprains/Strains/Simple Fractures
  • TB Skin Testing
  • Tetanus Shots
  • Work Physicals
  • Work-Related Injuries/Workers’ Comp
  • Wound Care

Occupational Health Services

  • Workers’ Compensation
  • Physicals
  • Drug Screening
  • Immunizations

Expedite your urgent care visit by signing in online:

Urgent Care Mandeville LA Medical Director

  • Dr. SchouestFred Schouest, M.D.

Dr. Fred Schouest, is an Emergency Medicine Specialist and a proud member of the MHM Urgent Care team. He brings more than 20 years of experience in Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Occupational Medicine to the MHM Urgent Care family. With its opening in December of 2013, Dr. Schouest assumed the role of Medical Director of MHM Urgent Care – Mandeville.

CONTACT INFORMATION

MHM Urgent Care – Mandeville
Address:
2735 Highway 190, Suite D
Mandeville, LA 70471

Phone: 985-778-2510
Fax: 985-778-2511
info@mhmurgentcare.com

HOURS OF OPERATION

Weekdays 8am – 8:00pm
Weekends 9am – 5:00pm

MHM URGENT CARE – LULING

MHM URGENT CARE – LULING

MHM Urgent Care – Luling offers the highest quality healthcare, and we can prove it! As a part of the MHM Urgent Care network, MHM Urgent Care – Luling was among the first urgent care centers in the United States to be given The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval. This means our centers have met the highest and most rigorous performance standards for patient safety and care. When you are ill or injured, trust MHM Urgent Care – Luling to take care of you on your time. We’ll do our best to have in-and-out in an hour.

Patient Services

  • Abscesses
  • Allergies
  • Asthma/Bronchitis
  • Bladder Infections
  • Colds/Flu
  • Cuts and Stitches
  • Ear Ache
  • Eye Infections
  • Fever
  • Flu Shots
  • Minor Burns
  • Nebulizer Treatments
  • On-site Digital X-Ray and Lab
  • Rashes
  • School Physicals
  • Sinus Infections
  • Sore Throats
  • Sports Injuries
  • Sprains/Strains/Simple Fractures
  • TB Skin Testing
  • Tetanus Shots
  • Work Physicals
  • Work-Related Injuries/Workers’ Comp
  • Wound Care

Occupational Health Services

  • Workers’ Compensation
  • Physicals
  • Drug Screening
  • Immunizations

Medical Director

DR_KINGJohn King, M.D.

Dr. John King was born and raised in Gadsden, Alabama. In 1976, he graduated from Emma Sansom High School and went on to attended Marion Military Institute from 1976 to 1978. He earned degrees in biology and chemistry from Birmingham Southern College in 1980 and was accepted to St. George’s University School of Medicine in Grenada, West Indies. Dr. King completed his doctor of medicine in 1985 and continued his training with an externship in Internal Medicine at the University of Alabama, Birmingham and an internship in Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania. Following, he returned to the University of Alabama where he completed his residency in Internal Medicine in 1987.

Immediately after his residency, Dr. King entered a Pulmonary Medicine/Critical Care fellowship program at Ochsner Medical Foundation. It was during this time that his Emergency Medicine experience began in several emergency departments across South Louisiana. Dr. King moved his family to the Houma/Thibodaux area after his fellowship and has been on staff at Chabert Medical center for more than 16 years.

His decision to open MHM Urgent Care – Luling began while working in the emergency department. Dr. King saw a prominent need for efficient, reliable, prompt, competent medical care in the Luling area. Dr. King is board certified in Internal Medicine and Pulmonary/Critical Care. He brings 21 years of experience, as well as his caring, professional demeanor to MHM Urgent Care – Luling.

CONTACT INFORMATION

MHM Urgent Care – Luling
Address:
12895 US Hwy 90, Suite H
Luling, LA 70070

Phone: 985-331-9400
Fax: 985-331-9401
info@mhmurgentcare.com

HOURS OF OPERATION

Weekdays 10 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Weekends 10 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Mhm Urgent Care Kenner LA

MHM URGENT CARE KENNER LA

MHM Urgent Care in Kenner opened in October 2002 under the direction of Dr. Gerry Cvitanovich. This Urgent Care Center was the first of its kind to be established in the community. Our Kenner urgent care location provides time-sensitive, cost-effective medical service of the highest quality for a broad spectrum of illnesses and injuries. For those patients who cannot wait for their primary care physician, but do not require ER service, MHMUC in Kenner is an excellent option, offering considerable savings of both time and money.

The extended hours and broad scope of services provided by MHM Urgent Care have made it a valuable resource to patients as well as to local physicians. Patients referred to MHM Urgent Care by their physician are treated appropriately and referred back to that physician for any follow-up. With an impressive track record of providing quality care, MHM Urgent Care and its affiliates became the first free-standing Urgent Care Centers in Louisiana to be accredited by The Joint Commission in 2009.

Patient Services

  • Abscesses
  • Allergies
  • Asthma/Bronchitis
  • Bladder Infections
  • Colds/Flu
  • Cuts and Stitches
  • Ear Ache
  • Eye Infections
  • Fever
  • Flu Shots
  • Minor Burns
  • Nebulizer Treatments
  • On-site Digital X-Ray and Lab
  • Rashes
  • School Physicals
  • Sinus Infections
  • Sore Throats
  • Sports Injuries
  • Sprains/Strains/Simple Fractures
  • TB Skin Testing
  • Tetanus Shots
  • Work Physicals
  • Work-Related Injuries/Workers’ Comp
  • Wound Care

Occupational Health Services

  • Workers’ Compensation
  • Physicals
  • Drug Screening
  • Immunizations

Expedite your urgent care visit by signing in online:

Kenner Urgent Care Medical Director Dr-SwartCynthia Swart, M.D.

Dr. Cynthia Swart is a graduate of the Ohio State University College of Medicine. Dr. Swart completed her residency in Family Practice at Mt. Carmel Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. She is Board Certified in Family Practice and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Family Practice. In addition to her work in Urgent Care, Dr. Swart also has experience in private practice, emergency medicine, and several administrative roles including Medical Director of a hospital Emergency Department. She is married with two boys and enjoys reading, painting, music and theater.

CONTACT INFORMATION

MHM Urgent Care – Kenner
Address:
708 West Esplanade
Kenner, LA 70065

Phone: 504-461-9660
Fax: 504-461-8450
info@mhmurgentcare.com

HOURS OF OPERATION

Weekdays 9 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Weekends 9 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Protect The Beat: How to Prevent Heart Disease

Protect The Beat: How to Prevent Heart Disease

Though our hearts are not immediately visible, they impact our health and well-being in myriad ways. A number of different factors determine whether the heart functions optimally—and heart disease is one of the most common conditions that can keep your heart from performing at its best. Heart disease is an overarching term that covers heart rhythm issues, heart attacks, coronary disease, and so on. Let’s take a look at some factors that impact heart health, and go through some easy tips to maintain a healthy heart.

Factor 1: How much you move

The average American works eight hours a day, spends another half-hour sitting in his vehicle, goes home to wolf down a large dinner, and spends the rest of the night on the computer or in front of the TV. Such a sedentary lifestyle is terrible for the heart. A lack of exercise is strongly correlated to an array of heart disease conditions.

What you can do: Instead of taking the elevator at work, take the stairs. Take a brisk walk to the corner store instead of driving. Join a local recreational sports league or volunteer as a youth sports coach to stay active. Your newfound commitment to physical activity will reduce your odds of heart disease, improve your endurance, and may even lift your mood.

Factors 2 and 3: Age and gender

Some heart disease risk factors are totally out of your control, and chief among these are age and sex. The elderly are at greater risk for heart disease due to the fact that the aging process often damages and/or narrows the arteries. Aging also has the potential to weaken the heart muscle.

Biological sex also impacts heart health. Men are more likely to suffer from heart disease than women. It’s worth noting that women are at a higher risk for heart disease after menopause.

What you can do: Men and post-menopausal women should be aware of their heightened risk, and make an extra effort to eat healthy and be physically active.

Factor 4: Smoking

Physicians universally agree that the consumption of nicotine constricts blood vessels. The carbon monoxide in cigarettes also has the potential to damage the inner lining of the blood vessels, increasing the risk of atherosclerosis. As a result, smokers are much more likely to suffer a heart attack than nonsmokers.

What you can do: Stop smoking.

Factor 5: Genetics

An individual’s genetics play an important part in his heart health. Those with family members who have experienced heart disease are more susceptible to having heart problems. This is especially true of individuals with a family history of coronary artery disease, especially if it is a parent who developed the condition before his late 50s or early 60s.

What you can do: Know your risk. If you have a family risk of heart attack or heart disease, you’ll need to be more vigilant in prevention.

Factor 6: Diet

Those who consume foods that are high in salt, fat, cholesterol, and sugar are at an extraordinarily high risk for heart disease. This poor diet leads to high blood cholesterol levels that significantly boost the chances of plaque formation. A poor diet can also cause obesity and diabetes, both of which put you at risk for heart disease.

What you can do: Those who consume a large amount of processed foods and sugar-laden drinks should make the effort to eat a more balanced diet. Substitute leafy greens, fresh fruits, and vegetables in place of foods that are high in sugar, salt, and fat.

Though you can’t control all of the variables that determine heart health, you can be proactive to reduce your odds of developing heart disease. Be conscious of your diet, your physical activity, and your family’s heart health history. Make the appropriate changes, and you will keep your heart as healthy as possible!

Women’s Heart Health

Women’s Heart Health

At MHM Urgent Care, we like to give you practical and useful information that you can use on a regular basis. And when it comes to women’s heart health, the more knowledge you have, the better you’ll be able to take care of yourself.

Heart disease is the #1 cause of death in women. It kills more women than men, and it kills more women than cancer. That’s a sobering statistic, but by including fatty acids in your healthy diet, and making sure to exercise, you can help keep your heart healthy.

Eat foods containing omega-3 fatty acids

If you do just one thing to help your heart, take an omega-3 supplement or eat two to three helpings of fish per week. According to the Mayo Clinic, one of the most respected institutions in medicine, omega-3 fatty acids appear to reduce the risk of heart disease, particularly sudden cardiac death. They also may decrease triglycerides (a “bad” type of fat), lower blood pressure, reduce blood clotting, decrease stroke and heart failure risk, reduce irregular heartbeats, and they may improve learning ability in children.

Get more exercise

How many times have you heard that exercise is good for your heart health? But before you think of marathons, 100-mile bike races, and Olympic decathlons, understand that virtually any exercise is good for your heart health.

The newest adage when it comes to exercise is that you should take 10,000 steps per day; some sources say this number is equivalent to the Surgeon General’s recommendation to get 30 minutes of exercise per day. If you can walk, then you can make 10,000 steps per day a part of your exercise routine. You can count these steps when shopping, strolling along the river, going to work and back, even vacuuming the house. 10,000 steps is exercise in its most basic form, and if you hit that number daily, your heart will be healthier because of it.

Will you gain greater health benefits by working up to a more strenuous exercise routine? Yes, but just doing the basics is still a very good habit to get into.

Take a look at your diet

A good diet has more to do with quality rather than quantity. Heart-healthy calories are what count here, and adding more leafy greens, whole grains, fruits and nuts, while cutting back on saturated fats, will make all the difference in the world.

If you insist on using oil, then use olive oil, peanut oil, or canola oil. These oils are better for you because they contain omega-3s, but fewer trans fats and saturated fats than corn oil.

Eat more chicken and fish and less red meat and pork. Try to eat several small meals throughout the day, instead of gorging at lunch or dinner, as this will keep you from getting overly hungry and eating too much at mealtime. These choices are all heart-healthy, good for you and your overall well being.

For more information on how women (and me) can improve their heart health, visit our previous blog, “Protect the Beat: How to Prevent Heart Disease”. You’ll find useful tips and advice on lifestyle improvement to help you combat the #1 women’s health problem: heart disease.

Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month: What You Need to Know

Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month: What You Need to Know

In 2012, 1.4 million people were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. 694,000 of those died from the disease.

As you might expect from the 4th most common cancer in the US, the numbers are large and scary. But what you may not expect, is that 60% of deaths could’ve been prevented with regular checkups once people enter their 50s.

Both men and women are at risk of developing colorectal cancer with that risk increasing dramatically as people age. There are also a number of other risk factors that you should be aware of. If any of these risk factors apply to you, begin scheduling screenings for colorectal cancer as soon as you reach the age of 50, if not a few years sooner.

Risk Factors

  • Family history of colorectal cancer
  • Colorectal polyps (extra bits of tissue that grow inside your intestine)
  • Ulcerative colitis (a disease that causes ulcers to grow in the rectum and colon lining)
  • Crohn’s disease, which is a disease that causes inflammation in your digestive system.
  • Smoker
  • Diet high in fat

What to Watch For

Although there are a number of symptoms to watch out for, you can develop colorectal cancer before symptoms begin showing – making it imperative to schedule screenings after the age of 50. The following are some of the common symptoms of colorectal cancer to watch out for:

  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Blood in the stool
  • Narrower than usual stools
  • Frequently occurring cramps or gas pains
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Weight loss without reason
  • The feeling that your bowels aren’t emptying completely
  • The feeling of being bloated or full

Colorectal Cancer Prevention Tips

In addition to getting screened on a regular basis, there are a number of changes in your lifestyle that can reduce the risk of developing cancer. Many of the following tips not only help to prevent colorectal cancer, but also help to improve heart health.

  • Stop smoking – Smokers are 18% more likely to develop colorectal cancer and many other health issues to boot, so make quitting a priority.
  • Less red meat – The consumption of red meat is linked to a higher risk of colorectal cancer. At the very least, use lean cuts, and trim/drain the fat whenever possible.
  • Don’t drink too much – People that drink 2-3 alcoholic beverages a day are 21 percent more likely to develop colorectal cancer.
  • Get your vitamin D and calcium – These nutrients go a long way in reducing your risk of developing colorectal cancer.
  • Exercise – Exercise fights a seemingly endless list of ailments, including colorectal cancer.
  • Get screened – As previously mentioned, early and frequent screenings have been proven to drop the fatal cases of this cancer by 60%. Screenings are even more vital given the frequent absence of symptoms, so don’t wait for a warning sign.

There’s no way around it, the full tests are no fun. But as a trade off for not getting cancer in your colon or rectum – it’s an easy decision. So tell your mom, your dad, your friend’s mom, and your mom’s dad, because sometimes we all could use a push to take the steps necessary to keep cancer at bay.

Kick Butts

Kick Butts

Some private battles happen in full view of friends, family, and colleagues. Quitting smoking fits squarely into this category with a private battle that has highest stakes possible: your life.

To successfully kick the habit, you need support from those around you and a little help from people who have been there. We’re giving you the advice and tips you need to make this year the one that you finally do it.

Make a Date and a Plan

The American Cancer Society has seen first-hand many reasons you should quit, but they can’t make the decision for you. They can, however, offer some sage advice on how to quit for good.

They suggest that once you decide to quit, think of the reasons and benefits of seeing it through.

  • Longer life—More time to spend with your children, grandchildren and spouse
  • More money—Cigarettes are expensive!
  • Fresher breath—And cleaner-smelling clothes
  • Better health—Check out the benefits of quitting smoking, courtesy of the American Lung Association

Once you’re clear on why you want to quit, and see clear benefits to quitting smoking, set a date to stop smoking, make a plan, and stick to it.

Know Your Weakness

Identifying your weak smoking moments or places can make quitting smoking a lot easier.

Many smokers feel disappointed when they attempt to quit cold turkey but return to smoking after a few days. They blame themselves, saying they have no willpower. This is just not true: nicotine in cigarettes is highly addictive, and your body is reacting to withdrawal. Your “weakness” is really a natural reaction to a chemical imbalance.

You do well during the busy workday, not thinking about cigarettes. Once home, or in the car to drive home, you crave a cigarette. Your weak moment is the automatic reaction to light up a cigarette during leisure moments. Replace the cigarette with some other busywork for your hands, like hand exercises, a crossword puzzle, or by playing a game on your phone.

If you know the craving is smoky bars or taverns, the Mayo Clinic suggests having an action plan in place to counter those weak spots. Replace the tavern with the no-smoking mall. Ask for support from your family to remind you not to smoke at home.

Get Professional Help

Your doctor can help you with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Choices abound:

  • Prescription medications
  • Patches
  • Gum
  • Lozenges
  • Nasal sprays
  • Inhalers

The Cleveland Clinic offers suggestions about both prescription and over-the-counter solutions.

Replace Habits

Smoking, while highly addictive, is also a learned habit. Breaking habits means replacing them with other practiced behavior. WebMD recommends a three-step process to breaking a bad habit, including smoking:

  • Make it conscious—Spend time thinking when, why and how you smoke, so you are more aware of your motivations and actions
  • Put it in writing—What just happened that made you feel a cigarette was a solution? Identify these triggers by writing them down, so they cannot sneak up on you!
  • Replace the action—A piece of gum, snapping your fingers or simply engaging in a moment of quiet meditation can substitute for the cigarette

Shake off Complacency

Action on Smoking & Health (ASH) offers a lot of educational material to help you re-educate yourself on just exactly what you are putting your beautiful body through when you smoke. Shake off your complacency, stop minimizing the harm you are doing, by immersing yourself in the brutal realities of smoking’s toll:

  • Over 20 percent of American deaths are from smoking
  • Tobacco smoke contains over 4,000 chemicals
  • More than 600,000 non-smokers die every year from secondhand smoke

Cigarette manufacturers deliberately manipulate the nicotine in cigarettes, says a study from Harvard School of Public Health, to deliver the drug for greater and greater addiction.

Your battle to quit smoking is yours to fight, but it’s also shared by many others. For the vast majority of people, this support system plays an absolutely vital role in their success. So lean on your friends and family, ask them to hold you accountable and to help you make this Kick Butts Day the one you look back on as the day you got back the healthy life you deserved.

Spring Break Safety

Spring Break Safety

Spring break is bananas.

College kids already feel invincible, so when you get a swarm of them together – you’re going to get some wild parties. And, yes, no matter what your college student told you, they are going for the party. The trick is knowing the simple, fundamental rules that can stop kids from finding out once and for all that they aren’t actually the immortals they believed.

Booze Control

Unfortunately, drinking is the national pastime for the vast majority of spring break-ers. If this is upsetting, feel free to skip this section.

Working with the assumption that drinking is going to happen, the best thing to do is concentrate on making sure your scholastic travelers know their body’s signals: Throwing up means no mas, getting dizzy means it’s time for a water break, and blacking out is never ok (literally never).

Also, no drinking and driving, diving, mo-peding, or any other activities that can be hazardous without your full wits.

So Much Water

When you’re having fun, drinking water can be the last thing on your mind. This is especially true when you’ve been knocking back the cold pops. But staying hydrated is important for your organs, for helping your body deal with any alcohol consumed, and for avoiding hangovers. And who doesn’t hate a hangover?

Sunscreen and More Sunscreen

Yep, it’s obvious, to you. But we’re talking about college kids here, so some things have to be said a few (hundred) times.

Your skin is yours for the foreseeable future, so maybe don’t go frying it, ok? Too much exposure to the sun can not only result in painful sun burns, but also long-term health issues as well, such as premature aging, changes in your skin texture, and even skin cancer. So if you plan on spending any time in the sun – even if it’s not on the beach or by the pool, apply sunscreen that is at a minimum SPF 15 and reapply every hour or so.

Don’t Forget your Prescription Medicine

The last thing you want is to be stuck in a foreign country where you don’t know the language without your prescription medication or without your family’s prescription medication. Always pack ahead of time, and don’t just throw your medicine into a bag – count it out to make sure you have more than enough doses to last during your time away from home.

Get your vaccinations

Planning a trip out of the country for your spring break vacation? Then be sure to find out what vaccinations are required and recommended before hand. You’re not going anywhere without required vaccinations, but it’s a good idea to get any recommended vaccinations as well. It doesn’t matter how nice the beaches are in South America if you’re laying sick in bed.

Are most of these things common sense? Sure. But think back to when you were in college. How common was common sense? Yep, that’s what we thought. So instead of being surprised by the near total absence of general wisdom in college aged vacationers, plan for it and you’ll both be better off.

8 Natural Ways to Beat Spring Allergies

8 Natural Ways to Beat Spring Allergies

The coming of spring means that more pollen is in the air and that spring allergies are likely to strike. These allergies cause a variety of unpleasant symptoms such as runny noses, sneezing, itchy eyes and nasal congestion. Of course, there are a range of synthetic medications you can take for allergies, but may sufferers prefer to use natural remedies. Here is a look at 8 natural ways to prevent allergies from interfering with your enjoyment of life.

Butterbur

This herb is an effective remedy for spring allergies, according to several scientific studies. One study, conducted by researchers in Switzerland, showed that butterbur is a strong antihistamine and works well in controlling the symptoms of hay fever. It also does not cause drowsiness, unlike some over-the-counter allergy medications.

Green Tea

When spring allergies hit, try drinking a cup of green tea. Studies undertaken by Japanese scientists show that green tea contains a substance that blocks certain allergic responses in the human body. Regularly drinking green tea may well reduce the sneezing and itchy eyes so often associated with allergies.

Spicy Food

Some hot foods have the power to provide relief to allergy symptoms such as nasal congestion and watery eyes. For instance, cayenne pepper contains a substance called capsaicin that is known to reduce congestion in the nasal passages. Also, a compound in garlic, allicin, is an anti-inflammatory that can reduce swelling and inflammation caused by allergies.

Neti Pot

Using a Neti pot, a small pot with a long, thin spot that fits into your nostril, is an effective way to clear sinus passages that are clogged due to an allergic reaction, according to WebMD. Your simply fill the pot with warm water and salt and tilt you head back. Then you fit the snout into a nostril and allow the solution to enter your nasal passages. Continue the procedure until the solution starts to flow out of the other nostril.

Humidifier

Dryness in your nose and sinuses caused by seasonal allergies can lead to congestion and swelling. One great way to counteract the dryness is to use a humidifier. This device releases water vapor into the air and helps moisturize your dry nasal and sinus passages, resulting in less congestion and discomfort.

Eucalyptus oil

This natural substance, which comes from the leaves of eucalyptus trees, has been shown by various studies to reduce inflammation caused allergies. For best results, add a few drops to a bowl of steaming water and breathe in the vapors.

HEPA Filter

Vacuuming your floor regularly can rid your home of the pollen that causes many spring allergy symptoms. To do this effectively, make certain that your vacuum has a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. These filters are extremely effective at minimizing the amount of symptom-causing pollen inside your house.

Protective Clothing

One of the easiest ways to reduce your exposure to pollen is to wear proper protective clothing when you go outside. Wear sunglasses, a wide brimmed hats and long pants to keep pollen from getting on your skin.

Using these natural remedies should help keep your spring allergies under control. If you can’t find the relief you need, you can always get help from an MHM URGENT Care clinic.

April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome Awareness Month

April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome Awareness Month

Experiencing a constant noisy stomach that gurgles, growls and bubbles away along with bloating, cramping and a combination of diarrhea and constipation are signs that you might have irritable bowel syndrome. Thankfully, there are ways to help diagnose the disease with a medicinal professional and things you can do to help manage the condition so you can live happily and at ease with the bowel disease.

Whom does irritable bowel syndrome affect?

Irritable bowel syndrome can affect both males and females, but it seems too mainly affect females the most. The reason to why is unknown, but medical research is slowly discovering it may have something to do with constant hormone changes, particular medications use to control other health conditions, heredity, physical and mental stress and lifestyle factors such as your diet.

What exactly is irritable bowel syndrome?

Irritable bowel syndrome is when you experience frequent changes with your bowel movements along with intestinal inflammation and abdominal distension. Some of the other signs and symptoms you may experience with irritable bowel syndrome are:

  • Urgency to have a bowel movement frequently
  • Abdominal pain and discomforts
  • gastro esophageal reflux
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Constant headaches
  • Constant backaches
  • Panic and anxiety attacks
  • Lack of a sexual drive
  • Fevers sometimes
  • Vomiting sometimes
  • Feeling nauseous
  • Hard to pass stools or watery
  • Blood and mucus in stool

What causes IBS?

As mentioned earlier, the causes of the disease are not clear, but medical researchers are discovering it could be because of factors such as:

  • Hormonal changes
  • Medications
  • Psychological disorders
  • Post-infection
  • Prolonged used of antibiotics that kills off healthy gut bacteria
  • Genetic defects
  • Physical and mental stresses
  • Over growth of bacteria in the small intestines
  • Fungal infections of the gut
  • Abnormalities in the gut flora
  • Chronic intestinal inflammation
  • Mast cells producing
  • Increase production of serotonin transporters

How is IBS diagnosed?

IBS is diagnosed by the symptoms a patient is feeling, but a doctor does have to study the symptoms and determine this condition for you so you have a proper diagnoses. Sometimes a colonoscopy is given to help rule out other conditions first since the disease shares the similar symptoms of other diseases and disorders out there such as celiac disease, thyroid disorders and lactose intolerance. Other testing that may be used to help diagnose the condition are:

  • Stool culture testing
  • Blood testing
  • Ultrasound testing of the abdomen
  • Endoscopy test
  • Biopsies
  • Hydrogen Breath Testing

What are the treatment options for IBS?

The treatment options for IBS are broad, but there is no cure for this disorder. Some of the treatments useful for managing the disease includes diet change, prescription medications such as steroids and pain relievers, fiber supplements, laxatives, exercise and stress management. Taking probiotic supplements for some people have been known to be helpful with control IBS symptoms. Some people even find peppermint and chamomile tea sipped slowly throughout the day to be beneficial. Other alternative therapies known to help relieve IBS symptoms are:

  • Yoga
  • Meditation
  • Acupuncture
  • Acupressure
  • Abdominal Massage
  • Psychological Therapy
  • Herbal Remedies such as Ginger, Slippery Elm, Red Clover, Alfalfa, Spearmint and Aloe Vera
  • Aromatherapy
  • Warm Baths

Some End Thoughts to Keep in Mind with IBS

The only way to know if you have developed IBS is to visit your doctor for a proper diagnoses. Your doctor can help you come up with the proper treatment plan to help manage your disease so you can live a life without discomfort, and the chronic urges of having to rush to the bathroom all the time. Keep in mind also, there is no cure, but living a healthier lifestyle can help put this disease in remission.